Installation represents a large termite mound, made entirely of wood.

At the entrance of the structure, visitors are greeted with a explanatory text of the idea was shown

“I gave up, I have to admit, I gave no more. My young rebellious spirit gave way to hackneyed phrases. That if any past was better, that if life is three days, if you were my age would understand . . . and the worst was not giving up but think that those still fighting were wrong.

I saw these young people struggle with hope and a certain innocence, while recognizing that innocence was becoming less or at least more fleeting. They were idealistic, had everything to do, but I saw what the future held for them, looked beyond the bubble in which we tried to protect them. I watched as others took advantage of all that, accumulated, devastated, destroyed, deflated illusions. Getting them to surrender to use their own hands to help them continue accumulating, devastating and destroying. The future could not be better, we were doomed to be the pawns of the great mound, whose queen was always hidden

But I woke up and saw that the past was only a possible future, and there were many possible futures, futures that were in our hands if we don’t surrender. I saw that together we could build without destroying that who governs us can not remain hidden, that bubbles are of illusion and can grow to infinity. And I had nostalgia, I had nostalgia for the Future.”

Miguel Arraiz García

complete set of pictures of the urban installation

credits: author: Miguel Arraiz García

additional credits: illustration: Marcelo Fuentes / serially piece modelled by: David Moreno / video (edit): estudio Menta / structural advice: Josep Martí

Acknowledgements: David Rosa, Francisco Pons, Juan Antonio Oñate, equipo Actimel, Raul Climent, Xavi Calvo, Elisa Gomez, Fernando Martinez, Jose Luis Lopez, Bruno Sauer, Jorge Linares, Giovanni Nardin, Jose Manuel Vidal, Alicia Peris, Xavi Serra, Ximo Muñoz, Roberto Muñoz, Javier Naharros, Oscar Rodriguez, Andres Fayos, Javier Vidal, Carol Entraigues, Susana Cuquerella

I have nostalgia of future

 

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